this book belongs to

Many children’s books have a page which invites you to write your name on it.  The only piece of paper in the whole book you are officially allowed to mark.  Do you write your name?  How do you feel about your name?  Do you abbreviate, have a nick-name, a tag, a pseudonym, are you aka…  or are you happy with your given name?  What does it say about you?  Does your name define you?  As Fly No Filter prepare to get to grips with The Glorious Tour’s character, Roni and consider what it might feel like to not like your name, we will be listening to My Name Is by Eminen on repeat.

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5 thoughts on “this book belongs to

  1. I have had quite the journey with my name. In general people struggle to pronunciation my name. In the past I have been happy to introduce myself with the shorten version of my name to make it ‘easier’ for them. I now introduce myself with my fall name and don’t concern myself too much about how people figure it out. My name means the One who brings the sun. It has power and when I respect it. Others do the same.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My nick name is my name, and it was given to me by my parents. It is very unusual in this country and I have never met anyone else called Mitzi here. So, especially when I was younger, it was an integral part of my identity… I was Mitzi, and Mitzi was me, nobody else. The only other Mitzi I have met was in France and she was Danish. Interestingly, we both appeared to take an immediate and mutual dislike to each other. I can only ascribe this to our both being aghast at someone else having the effrontery to be called our name (Mitzi is not common in Denmark either). I am told that Mitzi is the Austrian (or German) nick name for Maria, I have an Austrian grandmother and officially I am Maria Theresa, hence Mitzi. I don’t connect so much with the roots of my name; I never knew my grandmother and I don’t feel Austrian at all. But I love the name itself, I think it sounds very strong yet intimate, it is unusual and interesting, and it rolls off the tongue nicely. The only drawback is when speaking to strangers on the phone, to avoid confusion I have to use Maria instead – which really isn’t me!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wonderful Mitzi. “I was Mitzi, and Mitzi was me, nobody else.” I like to think that this empowering statement is one we pass to all our children when we name them, no matter how common or unusual their name

      Like

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