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Dance is an essential part of human expression.  SIN Cru Associate Artist, Maurizio (thanextone) sees dance in an inextricably linked dialogue with music; Action and reaction.  For others, dance is freedom of movement, with or without music.  Dance is entertainment, is passion, is tribal.  Is a sharing and appreciation of culture, and in recognising the very different dance styles which form part of Hip Hop culture, we can start to follow the dancer’s story and lineage.

There are several styles of dance which over the years have been awkwardly lumped together as Hip Hop Dance.  The Sinstars, our long established dance crew, is made up of dancers from all styles.  Historically the Sinstars have focussed on Locking, Poppin’, and BBoyin’

Locking
The history of locking can be traced back to 1970.  A young man by the name of Don Campbell was in the cafeteria of Trade Tech University in Los Angeles watching the popular dances of the time such as The Funky Chicken, The Sling, and The Slide.  As he tried to learn he stumbled on his own unique way of doing them.  The dances of the 70’s soul and funk era were usually done in a smooth, loose manner.  Don’s version was much sharper and was nicknamed the locks.  Friends would say, “yo Campbell, do the locks” and he would add a sharp stop – the lock.  This was the birth of Campbellocking later shortened to locking, which developed by incorporating moves including wrist twirls, points, knee drops and give yourself five.  In addition the hat tricks and play with a handkerchief moves were added.  Other talented dancers who contributed to the style, include Jimmy “Scooby Doo” Foster who invented The Scooby Doo, The Scootbot and The Stop ‘n’ Go; and James “Skeeter Rabbit” Higgins who invented The Skeeter Rabbit.  Don Campbell formed The Campbellock Dancers who became The Lockers.  They went on to huge commercial success in the 70’s performing by themselves and with big names of the time, and their influence on dance is still prevalent to this day.

 

Poppin’
Poppin’ is a funkstyles dance made of many different social dances, local styles and concept dances that came from California.  There are many conflicting stories about where the fundamentals of Poppin’, boogaloo, roboting and the connected styles all came from, what the exact correct terminology is, and who their founders were.  One of the most famous and notable groups of early poppin’ is The Electric Boogaloos, led by Boogaloo Sam. The E.Bs say the fundamentals of poppin’ and boogaloo came from them and their peer group hailing from Fresno California, and are made up from approximately 14 fundamental moves and styles: poppin’, ticking, strobing, walk out, twist o flex, neck o flex, master flex, wave, tidal wave, moon walk, back slide, scarecrow, tinman and puppet.  Different groups and individuals claim the history was more solidily based in other areas and with other pioneers.

Additional notables to research when finding out about poppin’ and its styles:
•animation/ 3D
•strutting
•saacing
•tutting
•bopping

Bboyin’
Breakin’ is a dance form born out of the Bronx, New York in the 1970’s.  The term Breaker originates from the instrumental break of a record mixed by DJs, or disc jockeys.  This is the section of a track which the dancers would favour, who, described by cultural critic Tricia Rose, would execute ‘moves that imitated the rupture in rhythmic continuity as it was hilighted in the musical break.’  This is where the name Break boy came from, which has been abbreviated to Bboy.  Bboyin refers to the whole culture of the dance form in which knowledge of foundation techniques such as footwork and toprockin, form the base for power moves.  Bboyin is contextualised by music, which inspires the dancer to intertwine their movement with the beat.  Not to be confused with a breakdancer who has learnt moves off youtube with no understanding of a cultural significance.  Traditionally bboys wear thick strapped belts with heavy buckles spelling out their name or crew.  It is Worzel Gummidge who uses a shoe lace to hold his trousers up.

 

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